Global Edition

Countdown to World Handicapping System introduction begins

2.23pm 4th November 2019 - Management Topics - This story was updated on Monday, November 4th, 2019

The World Handicap System (WHS) is ready to be launched from January 2020 and will provide golfers with a unified and more inclusive handicapping system for the first time.

Though many countries are planning to adopt the new system in January, the system will go live in other parts of the world throughout the year to accommodate different implementation plans and variations in the golfing calendar. It comes into play in the UK & Ireland in November 2020.

Developed by the R&A and USGA in close co-ordination with existing handicapping authorities, the WHS will provide all golfers with a consistent measure of playing ability, with handicaps calculated in the same way wherever they are in the world.

Beginning in 2020, the new WHS will be governed by The R&A and the USGA and administered by national and regional golf associations around the world. The existing six handicapping authorities, Golf Australia, the Council of National Golf Unions (CONGU) in Great Britain and Ireland, the European Golf Association (EGA), the South African Golf Association (SAGA), the Argentine Golf Association (AAG) and the USGA, represent approximately 15 million golfers in 80 countries who currently maintain a golf handicap.

A key objective of the initiative was to develop a modern system, enabling as many golfers as possible to obtain and maintain a Handicap Index. Golfers will be able to transport their handicap globally and compete or play a casual round with players from other regions on a fair basis. It will also indicate the score a golfer is reasonably capable of achieving the next time they go out to play.

The table lists the estimated implementation time frame for a selection of countries.

The WHS has two main components – the Rules of Handicapping and the Course Rating System. The Rules of Handicapping are encompassed within seven Rules to inform administrators and golfers on how an official Handicap Index is calculated and administered, with some flexibility given to national associations based on how the sport is played and enjoyed in their region. The Course Rating System, based on the USGA Course Rating System first adopted nearly 50 years ago and already adopted on nearly every continent, sets out a consistent method of determining a course’s difficulty. Together, these components become the foundational elements in determining a golfer’s Handicap Index.

Martin Slumbers, Chief Executive of the R&A, said: “The game of golf is transforming to meet the needs of the modern-day golfer; modernising the Rules this year was an important step forward in that regard and the World Handicap System will be another. Our hope is that the launch of the WHS will be a catalyst for change; signalling the start of a new era of golfer engagement, being inclusive by embracing all golfers, whatever their level of ability, and broadening its appeal to a much wider audience.”

He added: “Change also means opportunity and, managed appropriately, this can only be good for the game. It does mean there will be a period of adjustment, as we saw with the new Rules, but once it beds in golfers and golf clubs will benefit in many ways from the new system.”

Mike Davis, CEO of the USGA, said: “When the golf community works together, everyone benefits. We have seen the benefit that handicapping has provided for decades, providing greater enjoyment for all who play. To have a single set of Rules of Handicapping for the game will connect golfers from country to country, and we are excited to bring the best of all worlds together through this initiative. It is one of the many ways we are investing in golf’s future, to strengthen and foster growth of the entire game for years to come.”

In preparation for the launch of the WHS, more than 3,000 golf courses have been rated for the first time and an extensive education programme has been delivered. By the end of 2019, more than 90 National Associations will have attended an educational seminar and a robust library of resources is hosted on WHS.com to support regional education.

Rules of Handicapping books are being produced and will be translated and delivered through national associations. In addition, the USGA and The R&A have developed a series of golfer-focused materials, including videos, infographics and posters, which can be used by national associations and shared with golf clubs for the benefit of golfers.  This includes a promotional video featuring Annika Sorenstam, Gary Player and voices from recreational golfers from around the world to encourage as many golfers as possible to obtain and maintain a handicap.

Mike Greener, Handicap and Course rating co-ordinator with England Golf, said: “England Golf is committed to working alongside our affiliated clubs throughout this process and will continue to provide support, resources and guidance during the transition to the new system.”

As an extension of their support of the Rules of Golf worldwide, Rolex has made a commitment to support The R&A’s and the USGA’s efforts to implement the World Handicap System.

       

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