Global Edition

 

Raise a glass to Paul McGinley

4.00pm 27th March 2000 - Corporate

In the light of Friday’s ‘St Terry’s Day’, a mythical day of celebration imagined up by Guinness in order to give drinkers of the ‘Black Stuff’ an extra opportunity to down their favourite tipple, it seems only appropriate to toast another Irish legend in the making.

Dubliner and Taylor Made-adidas Golf Tour player Paul McGinley has hit a dazzling patch on the golf course and he accredits his latest advance to a switch of clubs. Paul, a new signing to the Taylor Made 2000 Team, is playing with the Taylor Made FireSole Irons and is one of the first Tour players to adopt the new SuperSteel Driver.

Paul’s FireSole Irons have gained him a telling advantage yet his drives have also increased due to the technology behind Taylor Made’s newest innovation, the SuperSteel range. SuperSteel has been developed with one of the strongest and best performance steel materials. The higher strength steel allows for a more optimal weight distribution and a thinner, more responsive face, creating maximum ball velocity and distance.

For Paul, his change of clubs seems to have precipitated a blistering run of form. He has had three top ten finishes over the past month, and is now placed 7th on the current Volvo Order of Merit.

“I’m in no doubt this technology has improved my game. I’m much more consistent with my irons and I’m hitting the ball further off the tee. I’m excited about adding more Taylor Made innovation to my game, namely the Inergel golf ball” said Paul.

With the passing of St Patrick’s Day, Cheltenham and the outstanding victory over the French rugby team (not to mention St Terry’s Day!) it seems that Ireland have yet another sporting hero to raise their glasses to, Guinness filled or otherwise!

 

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