Global Edition

 

Hit it further with Hi-Tec

12.01am 1st March 2005 - Corporate

Today Hi-Tec is set to launch the world’s most innovative golf shoe technology ever. The technology is called Hi-Tec CDT – Custom Directional Traction. The equation is simple: increased grip + stability + balance = power, control and distance and the price is £85.00 per pair.
Two years ago Europe’s No.1 player Padraig Harrington set the product development team at Hi-Tec challenge. What could they do to help him hit the ball longer off the tee and to give him better control and consistency off the fairway?
An intensive research period followed utilizing the biomechanical expertise of Dr Paul Hurrion of the Quintic Consultancy, a biomechanic scientist who works with the British athletics team as well as a number of sports personalities Many prototypes later the ideal sole design and cleat configuration was finally arrived at, now known as the CDT Launch Pad Outsole.
Hi -Tec says that Custom Directional Traction is a first in golfing footwear. The fully adjustable directional cleat system allows a player to configure the traction elements to suit their style of play or the local conditions. It results in increased stability enabling them to hit the ball harder, faster and further.
The launch pad outsole is a unique design that helps optimize the swing of players. Essentially it helps give the player better balance by ensuring that the grip is maximized at the key moments of the swing. Better balance leads to more control that in turn leads to more distance and accuracy.
This is additionally facilitated through the revolutionary fully flexible CDT cleat system that can be customized to suit individual needs when combined with the MacNeill Q-Lok® system. In essence, it improves stability when playing a shot for greater power.
With over with over 4 million possible configurations, Hi-Tec spent months of exhaustive research and testing with Europe’s No.1 professional golf player Padraig Harrington to decide the best set- up options. The results were outstanding; Padraig’s personal favourite, The Power Plus – provides optimum traction to fully load the swing – the Perimeter – ideal for the all-rounder; the Uphill/Downhill – ideal for hilly courses.
To arrive at the optimum outsole design and CDT configurations, Hi-Tec, Padraig and Dr. Hurrion observed, recorded and analysed Padraig’s foot movement not only with high speed film but also utilising force platforms and specially developed analytical software. The team took particular interest in weight distribution and changing pressure patterns during Padraig’s swing.
The longer a player’s centre of gravity can continue towards the target the more energy is directed there – improving confidence, efficiency and accuracy. This measurement is referred to as the Longitudinal Stability Index (LSI). Unfortunately all players deviate from this ideal line, thus reducing the energy flowing in the optimum direction. The results of Padraig hitting a 5 iron under three different test conditions were unquestionable:
In a test conducted at the 2004 US Open Padraig, using the same club and ball as in 2003 but using the CDT Power shoes, increased his ball speed from 166 mph to 173 mph. Following the Hong Kong Open in December 2004, Padraig was leading the European Tour in driving distance with an average of 320.6 yards.
“Golfers are always questioning their game. I‘ve wondered: could shoe technology increase the power of my swing? And is there something out there better than metal golf spikes? Eighteen months ago I sat down with Hi-Tec and Quintic Consultancy to investigate. The hard work paid off. The answers are yes and yes. Judge the results for yourself,” said Padraig Harrington
Hi-Tec CDT technology www.hi-tec.com.cdt

       

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