Global Edition

 

British Seed Houses opens new facilities at Lincoln

8.05am 28th July 2008 - Corporate

British Seed Houses’ staff gathered recently to mark the completion of development work at the company’s site at Witham St Hughs. Located on the Nottinghamshire/Lincolnshire border, the company has operated out of the site for more than 30 years and purchased it outright in 2001. The decision was taken to expand the facilities to accommodate BSH’s growing amenity seeds business.

Eighteen members of staff are now based at the modern office complex which also houses a seed testing laboratory. Seed is cleaned and blended on-site and the improved 80,000 square foot warehouses provide improved product storage and packaging, resulting in faster order response times.

British Seed Houses’ managing director William Gilbert said, “We expect all our customers to benefit from the expanded storage and processing facilities through improved service and faster turnaround of orders.”

British Seed Houses provides a comprehensive service to the amenity sector across the whole of the UK through its facilities in Lincoln and Bristol. A dedicated team of regional advisors deal direct with the customer, not through distributors.

Its Grade ‘A’ Range of seed mixtures is ideal for use across the golf course, in sports grounds and stadia and also for landscaping purposes. Its grasses are used at many high-profile venues including the 2010 Ryder Cup Course at the Celtic Manor Resort (Providence).

Since 1988, scientists at IGER (Institute of Grassland & Environmental Research) and British Seed Houses have worked together in a unique relationship, forming the UK’s largest grass breeding programme.

British Seed Houses www.bshamenity.com

       

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