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Golf architects in Scotland form new association

7.44am 13th January 2009 - People

Five Scottish golf course architects – with two more set to join – have grouped together to form the Scottish Association of Golf Course Architects (SGCA).

Over the last ten years a number of new, qualified Scottish golf course architects have emerged, having achieved qualifications in GCA via the Degree course at the Edinburgh College of Art or a Diploma course run by the European Institute of Golf Course Architects (EIGCA).

“During the last 10 years it has been evident that the majority of people in the golfing industry, both in Scotland and abroad, still only recognised James Braid as the most modern of Scottish GCAs.” says founder member Ronnie Lumsden. “With a number of very able professionals around it was clear that this had to change. Graeme Tait, Malcolm Clapperton and I set about creating an Association to ‘promote the highest standards of golf course architecture in Scotland’.

“Based on adopting the best practice and a professional approach we aim to provide a ‘body’ of qualified GCAs who can provide advice and services to new developers and existing courses to ensure that Scotland’s Golf course designs maintain the standards that the rest of the world would expect from the ‘home of golf’.

“We launched the website in October 2008 and our first year of membership started on 1st January 2009 with 6 members.”

To achieve SGCA objectives, all members are required to meet standards set by the Association to ensure the highest quality of professional service. These standards are based on a foundation of education, qualifications, training, experience and a sound knowledge of the design history of Scottish golf courses. Full details appear on the Association’s website at www.scotagca.co.uk.

Scottish Association of Golf Course Architects www.scotagca.co.uk

       

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