Global Edition

 

E-Learning for caddies

12.30am 19th June 2003 - People

Aspiring caddies all around the world can now learn how to be a caddie from home using a unique CD-Rom developed at St Andrews.

The CD-Rom is an e-learning version of Caddie Connect, the unique caddie training programme developed by the caddie manager at St Andrews Links, Rick Mackenzie, and Elmwood College, the Scottish centre of excellence for golf-related studies.

Funded by a grant from Scottish Enterprise and created by KnowledgePool, the e-learning programme is based on six modules.

These include the history of caddies, role of the modern caddie, on-course practice, customer care and selection of golf clubs in a variety of situations. Skills such as communication and time management are also included in the programme.

“By using this e-learning programme, the course will be made readily accessible from anywhere in the world. The growth of golf tourism throughout the world has increased the need for formally trained caddies who can provide the high level of service that golfers expect. Caddie Connect is already popular in the UK and we expect the CD-Rom to enable and encourage clubs in other countries to raise the standards of their caddie service,” said Carol Borthwick, director of golf and international affairs at Elmwood College.

The CD-Rom represents the classroom content of Caddie Connect and the first stage of the programme. The second stage is assessment by golfers of 30 rounds caddying at a local golf course. The third stage is the final exam and certificate of competence resulting in the St Andrews Standard, recognised by the Scottish Qualification Authority.

The CD-Rom is available from June 2003 for £295. For further information please visit www.standrews.org.uk or telephone Int. + (0) 1334 466666.

       

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