Global Edition

US golf consumer spending steady

12.30am 24th September 2002 - Management Topics

Despite downturns in the US economy and a bearish market, golf spending remained steady over the past two years. According to the latest research report by the National Golf Foundation (NGF) golf consumer spending in 2001 totalled more than $23 billion, up 2.9 percent over the past two years, and another $26 billion in golf travel, up 0.4 percent over the past three years.

The Spending Report: Sizing the Golf Consumer Marketplace provides three reports in one – Golf Consumer Spending in the U.S., The U.S. Golf Travel Market, and Non-Golf Spending Behaviour by Golfers.

Retail spending is broken out by golfing and demographic characteristics, as well as how spending on equipment and golfing fees increased or decreased between 1999 and 2001. The U.S. golf travel market is described in terms of number and types of travellers, spending and destinations. Of particular interest are the spending habits of “best customers” who make up one-third of all golfers but account for two-thirds of golf travel spending. Golf consumers are further profiled by revealing their spending habits on non-golf items such as cars, beverages and consumer electronics. A special appendix shows Internet use and behaviours by golf consumers.

“The participation report we released earlier in the year held some good news for the industry. Golfers and rounds were holding steady in the middle of a bad economic cycle,” commented Jim Kass, director of research at the NGF. “The Spending Report adds some sparkle to that initial report and tells us exactly where the golf industry is growing.”

As a result of the economic conditions of 2001, the NGF is keeping a close watch on golf consumer spending in 2002. A new report examining golf consumer spending for 2002 will be available April 1, 2003.

For more information on The Spending Report: Sizing the Golf Consumer Marketplace and other NGF reports contact ngf@ngf.org

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