Global Edition

 

Birthplace of Open Golf goes on the market

4.13pm 5th September 2016 - Property

Red Lion (exterior)

The Scottish pub famed as the birthplace of the British Open Golf Championship has been placed on the market, shortly after undergoing a successful refurbishment and re-launch.

The historic Red Lion in Prestwick on the South Ayrshire coast has been going for almost 200 years and was the preferred meeting place of a group of enthusiastic golfers who in 1851 decided to form a club, building a course with the help of greenkeeper Old Tom Morris. They then hosted the first Open Championship in 1860.

Red Lion interior
Red Lion interior

Since then, the pub has had its ups and downs but was extensively revamped recently in a way that keeps much of the original character of the old golfing haunt. Now the owners, who re-launched the Red Lion in April under a new head chef, have put the property and business on the market with a guide price of £1.1m.

Paul Shiells, director, Licensed and Leisure, with Colliers International in Scotland, is handling the sale.

He said: “This pub has certainly got a bit of history attached, and that adds to its appeal. However, it is also important to note that following the work and investment put in by the sellers, it is a thriving and highly desirable licensed business returning substantial sales and bottom line profits”

The Red Lion, 9 The Cross, Prestwick, South Ayrshire, KA9 IAJ is a modern licensed venue comprising public bar and lounge, cocktail bar and restaurant, with rear car parking and external drinking space. The large partial upper floor is suitable as owners’ accommodation.

Further information from Paul Shiells Paul.Shiells@colliers.com

       

You can see the latest news letter here.

Follow us on Twitter and LinkedIn.            

Use the buttons above to control the search results you want.

Prefixing a search term with a hyphen will exclude results matching that term.
For example 'green -greenkeeper' will return results containing 'green' but not 'greenkeeper'.