Global Edition

 

TGA aims for quality

9.00am 7th February 2002 - People

Following a successful launch in 2001, the Turfgrass Growers Association (TGA) will be holding a second series of half-day training courses at venues in the West Midlands, Yorkshire, Berkshire and Surrey between March and June 2002.

Targeted primarily at professionals who supply, specify or install quality sports, amenity or ornamental turf surfaces, the courses are being hosted by independent turf consultant and agronomist, Robert Laycock, the appointed advisor to the TGA.

Course content has been carefully chosen to help attendees understand and achieve optimum selection, installation and after-care of cultivated turf. Specific attention will be paid to the importance of turf quality and the various methods of quality assessment, including the TGA standards for cultivated turf, independently drawn up in 1996. Mr Laycock will also look at the selection of turf for different lawn situations together with lawn design, establishment and long-term care, including the most suitable equipment for the job.

The first TGA training course of the 2002 season takes place at Birmingham City Football Club on 18 March. Further courses will be held on 23 April at a venue near Bradford, Yorkshire; on 22 May at a venue near Reading, Berks and on 18 June at a venue near Reigate, Surrey.

The TGA has announced that its first national turf conference will be staged on 24 October 2002 at the East of England Showground, Peterborough. Aimed at professionals involved in any aspect of turf growing, installation and maintenance, this high profile event will feature prominent speakers from across the industry.

To register for or to receive further details on the TGA conference or the TGA’s 2002 training courses, please contact TGA headquarters, telephone 01728 723672 or e-mail: david.clarke@turfgrass.co.uk

Turfgrass Growers Association www.turfgrass.co.uk

       

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