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Short-Game Guru Heads for London Golf Show

12.42am 1st April 2010 - Exhibitions & Conferences - This story was updated on Wednesday, April 7th, 2010

Golfers looking to improve their chipping and putting can get tips from the man behind some of the best short games in the world at the London Golf Show.

Dave Pelz, short game and putting coach to top professionals including three-time major winner Phil Mickelson, will be at the golfing extravaganza on Friday, 30 April and Saturday, 1 May imparting his knowledge with putting masterclasses on the show’s greens as well as being interviewed on stage.

Pelz has dedicated his career to developing techniques and equipment to improve the short game. The former NASA scientist holds 17 patents on golf equipment and his designs have been used to manufacture numerous popular clubs, including Odyssey’s two-ball putter which has sold 3.9 million worldwide.

His career has seen him work with a host of top professionals including Mickelson, Vijay Singh, Colin Montgomerie and Tom Kite and his students have amassed 18 majors between them.

In 1999 Dave Pelz’s Short Game Bible topped the New York Times Best Sellers list and Golf Digest named Pelz as one of the 25 most influential coaches of the 20th century.

Pelz said: “I’m looking forward to the London Golf Show and helping some British golfers improve their short game and putting skills. I’m excited to meet the visitors and learn more about their games and interests. It’s great to have an event that gives golfers everything under one roof.”

As well as appearing on the stage and putting green, Pelz will also be promoting his Dave Pelz Scoring Game School courses at Killeen Castle, the 2011 Solheim Cup venue located just half an hour from Dublin Airport, and signing copies of his new book, Dave Pelz’s Damage Control.

London Golf Show www.londongolfshow.com

       

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