Global Edition

 

Winter flood warning

7.35am 12th September 2007 - Corporate

The Environment Agency has issued “enhanced flood warnings” across England and Wales due to the heavy spring and summer rainfall, which has saturated soil.

Terry Marsh, of the centre for Ecology and Hydrology at Wallingford in Oxfordshire said that although a period of sustained sunshine could dry out waterlogged ground, the approaching winter months could bring the danger of more flooding, persisting into next year.

“Soils have been the wettest since records began in 1961,” he said. “If we have a very dry autumn, soils could dry out but, typically, with average rainfall we can expect an enhanced flood risk all throughout autumn and winter.”

David Green, MD of Terrain Aeration, the one-metre deep de-compaction specialists advised turf managers with compaction panning problems to act now before heavy rain made winter sports pitches and golf courses un-playable.

“By relieving compaction problems now we can help ensure a healthy flow of water from the surface,” he said. “Once the ground has become severely water-logged it could be months before it can be treated, and so cause widespread and expensive damage.”

Reacting to warnings from the STRI about the dangers of contaminated soil following the recent floods, Green said that his company was able to offer an eco-friendly, biological solution.

“Whilst performing our one-metre deep, compressed air de-compaction treatment we are able to inject benign Bacterial Cultures or Oil Digesting Bugs one metre down into the root zone. These friendly bacteria will biodegrade the oils leaving the site clean prior to seeding or planting.”

Terrain Aeration www.terrainaeration.co.uk

       

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